Internet dating magazine

Thanks to online dating sites, Jacob pursues dates with “one or two very pretty, ambitious women a week.” He recently ended a two-year relationship with a 22-year-old; he’s currently juggling flings with “a paralegal and a lawyer who work at the same law firm, a naturopath, a pharmacist, and a chef.” writer Dan Slater frames him, is the embodiment of a new dating market where the allure of “online romance is threatening monogamy.” Whenever he meets another woman online, Jacob (not his real name) thinks: “This person could be exclusively for me, but so could the other two people I’m meeting this week.” Why have a real relationship, Slater asks, when there are so many attractive, successful partners waiting online?

I don’t know—maybe because we're not all aimless and lazy thirtysomething straight dudes?

Marriage will live on, no matter how valiantly Jacob scams on women.

I’m actually glad to finally hear from a Jacob, the male counterpoint to Kate Bolick’s own examination of “All the Single Ladies” who end up paired, impermanently, with guys like him.

Instead, he presents as evidence quotes from male online dating executives who say stuff like, “I often wonder whether matching you up with great people is getting so efficient, and the process so enjoyable, that marriage will become obsolete.” Let us set aside the bizarre assertion that marriage has survived until now, as an institution, because it is so fun and that anything that is more fun threatens its very existence.

Let us instead examine this notion that online dating is an "enjoyable" experience.

Either way, I think that most people are unlikely to conclude, “I like him, but wait—there are so many other quality men waiting for me …

A couple of months ago, I was sitting at a bar minding my own business when the woman next to me did something strange.

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In fact, by several measures, online dating has proved even more useful — both to individuals and society — than the traditional avenues it has replaced.I wondered to myself, is this what online dating has done to us?Is it creating a new reality in which people actively avoid real-life interactions?"There are a lot of theories out there about how online dating is bad for us," Michael Rosenfeld, a sociologist at Stanford who has been conducting a long-running study of online dating, told me the other day."And mostly they're pretty unfounded." Rosenfeld, who has been keeping tabs on the dating lives of more than 3,000 people, has gleaned many insights about the growing role of apps like Tinder.

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